Next Stop: Auroville

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I’m packing today to leave for India on an overnight flight tonight.  I’m lucky enough to be one of a handful of UnBox Fellows on the Sustainable Lifestyles fellowship put on by Quicksand Design Studio and anchored by Chintan Jani of Auroville.  The fellowship will last from Jan 24–Feb 1 and then we’ll take part in the UnBox Festival in Delhi, Feb 2-5 (registration is open to attend).

About the Festival:

“The UnBox Festival celebrates interdisciplinary processes and experiences that shape contemporary thought and action.”  More info + registration at unboxfestival.com >>

About the fellowship:

“Auroville, an international township in South India, is a hotbed for innovations in sustainable lifestyles and life practices. Fellows will interact with experts who would advise them and give them a hands-on experience in technologies around organic food and farming, sustainable building technologies, renewable energy and waste management. Besides building a broader understanding of sustainable technologies, they would, with the help of some long term Auroville residents, immerse themselves in a few of such sustainable communities discussing the advantages, challenges and pitfalls.”  More info on the fellowship’s home page >>

About Auroville:

I’m excited to visit, observe, participate and learn. Auroville looks like an amazing place, described as “a universal city in the making” on its website.  “Auroville is a place in south India where, for 40 years now, an increasing number of people from all over the world have been quietly and painstakingly working on the construction of a new township, a new way of living, a new way of being. Something is being attempted here for the benefit of all. … Today, the Auroville project is quite well established, having found ways of collaborating with the villages in its bioregion, with the Indian authorities, with many non-governmental organisations and world bodies worldwide.”  There are some 2,000 people from 40 different countries living there today.

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